Itlog na Maalat (Salted Eggs)

Duck eggs are traditionally used to make salted eggs but chicken eggs work fine too. Salted eggs is made by soaking the eggs in a brine solution for about three weeks or more and keep them in a dark and dry place—preferably the cupboard. Eggs don’t cure quickly in cooler temperatures and its curing period depends on the climate’s temperature. In tropical countries like the Philippines, salted eggs cure after three weeks—and it takes longer in a cooler climate like Canada.

Ingredients :

  • 8 fresh duck (or chicken eggs)
  • 4 cups water
  • 1-1/2 cups salt
(Cooking Chart)

Cooking Procedures :

  1. Place the eggs in a wide-mouthed jar (or glass) container with a lid.
  2. In a saucepan, fill in with the water and bring to boil. Add the salt gradually and stir until the salt is completely dissolves. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.
  3. Pour the cooled salted water over the eggs, making sure the eggs should be completely submerged with the water.
  4. Cover and store the container in a dark place for at least 3 weeks. (To test the saltiness of the egg, take out one egg from the container after 3 weeks. Boil the egg over high heat for 30 minutes (salted eggs takes more time to cook than regular eggs). Let cool for a few minutes and peel the shell and taste.
  5. If you like the saltiness of the egg, you may now take out the other eggs from the container and boil them. Let them cool and store in the refrigerator. But, if you want the eggs to be more salty to taste, you can leave the salted eggs in the container for another 2 weeks.

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